6 Extraordinary African Historical Sites You Have to Visit on Safari – Part 1

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Africa is an incredible place to come witness not just if you are a nature lover but also if you are a history buff.

Many anthropologists call Africa “the Mother Continent” because of its numerous archaeological findings that predate all other known evidence of Homo sapiens and our direct ancestors. Additionally, hundreds of different cultures have left their permanent mark around the continent with awe-inspiring structures, cities and monuments. Put together, visiting nearly any country in Africa can quickly transport you many centuries and millennia into the past.

If you are interested in enjoying an African historical safari as part of your next trip abroad, consider seeing some of the following highlights during your visit to the birthplace of humankind as we know it:

 

Fossil Hominid Sites of South Africa

When going on a historical trip to Africa, you might as well begin at where it all began! Located just a short drive outside Johannesburg and Pretoria, the Fossil Hominid Sites contain some of the earliest discovered remnants of human ancestors, dating back around 3.3 million years ago.

The Taung skull, an Australopithecus africanus specimen, was discovered here back in 1924. Even more ancient human predecessors were discovered since that time, including Paranthropus, an extinct genus of human-like apes that first began walking upright and using tools.

Sites in this region also depict some of the earliest evidence of domesticating fire, dating back over one million years ago. Because of these monumental finds, many academics refer to this region as the “Cradle of Humankind,” and it has been designated as one of South Africa’s eight UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

 

Mamuno Monument — Botswana

The Kangumene Engravings in Botswana are one of the few early human artistic carvings that have survived the test of time. Although the engravings themselves are quite abstract, they show a glimpse into the mind of our ancestors as they sought to express themselves using nature as their canvas.

Other markings depict the sharpening or creation of stone tools, making Mamuno an important location for documenting early human activities.

 

Olduvai Gorge — Tanzania

Almost as significant to our understanding of human evolution as South Africa’s Hominid Fossil Sites, Olduvai Gorge allows us to trace the evolutionary progression of hominid species to hominins.

Artifacts such as bones bearing gnaw marks and stone tool production sites chart the advancement of early humankind as we first began to move from only scavenging and hunting behaviors to more advanced tool-making and social interaction. Findings here date back more than 1.9 million years ago, and they provide strong evidence for the theory that the human species first evolved in Africa.

 

Moving Beyond Pre-History on Your African Historical Safari Tour

These three sites are some of the most critical for understanding how humans diverged from our ancestors and began developing the early marks of civilization. Part 2 of this post will describe more recent sites spanning the eras of Islamic migration into Africa and European colonization.

If you are interested in booking the perfect historic African safari tours to visit any or all of these sites, take a look at our available African safari tour packages, or contact us to enquire about a custom-made package for your group.

Jill Liphart for www.rohoyachui.com

 

Top 5 African Street Foods to Try

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Part of the joy of encountering new countries and cultures is trying the delicious food they make hot and fresh for a quick meal or mid-day treat. Compared to typical dishes a family might cook at home, these street foods are simple and indulgent. They are also usually quite easy to eat, making them perfect for a pick-me-up or a meal on-the-go.

Note that eating at street stalls can be risky for your health compared to an established restaurant, but there are strategies you can use to reduce your risks.

For those on an African safari vacation who have the stomach to give them a try, the following street foods will have them smacking their lips and dreaming about their next trip:

Bobotie

Bobotie is a South African dish with roots that go back to Ancient Rome. The dish is prepared with sweet and spicy mincemeat, usually containing finely minced beef and lamb mixed with chopped almonds and dried fruit. This mixture is heavily spiced with curry powder as well as ginger, marjoram and lemon rind, giving it a complex aroma and a delicious contrast of flavors.

This mincemeat preparation is cooked for hours and then topped with a mixture of scrambled eggs and milk-soaked bread, creating a gooey topping that soaks up all the lovely juices from the mincemeat.

Street vendors serve up bobotie in big slabs held within paper trays, but the dish is also served in restaurants with a side of yellow rice and veggies.

Kelewele

Simple and satisfying, this Ghanaian snack takes fried plantains and covers it in a dusting of powdered cayenne, ginger and salt. The result is savory, golden-brown crispy outsides and a soft, semi-sweet interior.

People usually eat kelewele as a side dish with meats or stews, but it can also be eaten on its own as a snack.

Mofo Gasy

If you love sweet breakfast treats, then you just may be dreaming about mofo gasy after your first experience. This specialty bread is made in Madagascar and has since spread to parts of the eastern mainland. It is made with rice flour, sweetened condensed milk, yeast and vanilla and then slowly grilled over charcoals. The resulting pastries are sweet, fluffy and crispy on the outside, and they go great with fresh-cut fruit and a mug of strong coffee!

The Boerie Roll

South Africa’s German influences come alive in this spice-laden beef sausage stuffed with allspice, clove, nutmeg and coriander. These sausages are grilled until crispy and served on a crunchy baguette loaf for the ultimate hearty mid-day meal.

Suya

Possibly Nigeria’s favorite dish, suya is a barbequed preparation of marinated strips of fish, beef, chicken or offal. The meats are steeped in a mixture of paprika, ginger, onion powder and ground peanuts for several hours before getting charred over hot flames. The crispy results are sweet, spicy and easy to put down, making eating just a few difficult!

Try These Delicious Foods and More on an African Safari Vacation

See some of the world’s most magical animals and eat some of its best foods when you book an African safari vacation package today.

Jill Liphart for www.rohoyachui.com

 

 

The Best Family Friendly African Safari Lodges and Camps

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As we just mentioned in an earlier post, taking your children with you on a safari can be a truly rewarding and eye-opening experience for them that they will carry with them for the rest of their lives. One of the biggest keys to giving them an enjoyable experience is finding services and lodging that can accommodate your family with privacy, flexibility and a variety of available activities.

Those searching for the perfect family friendly African safari lodge that can provide all of these qualities and more should consider the following options:

Mara Bush Houses, Kenya

Located within the Maasai Mara conservancies area, the Mara Bush Houses gives you freedom beyond what most other game lodges could ever hope to offer. Families get run of one of three private homes with three spacious bedrooms. Laundry service and several meals are included, and the facilities even have a swimming pool!

Your family will likely not be spending too much time at the house during the day, though, thanks to all the activities offered. You and your children can enjoy private game drives, night drivers, cultural visits and even lessons in how to act like a real guide and tracker at the Mara Naboisho Conservancy.

Simbavati River Lodge, South Africa

Located near Kruger, this lodge provides an incredible, tranquil experience with lots of included activities and plenty of areas for children to play. Parents can enjoy privacy in their own room along with a balcony overlooking the Olifants River. The lodge also has a large, open lounge area, a kids’ room and an outdoor play area, offering the perfect chance for children to get all their energies out.

Two daily game drives are included, and a swimming pool is available. Best of all, the Simbavati River Lodge is affordable relative to the many other options in the area.

Laikipia Wilderness Camp, Kenya

For the family that truly wants to get away from it all and has outdoor-loving kids, the Laikipia WIlderness Camp in northern Kenya offers the perfect combination of remoteness and lush, inviting surroundings. Bush walks in the area are legendary, and families can enjoy rafting, fishing and swimming in the rivers nearby.

A large number of conservancies and parks are a short distance away, too, creating the opportunity for many diverse game drives.

HillsNek Safari Camp, South Africa

Located on the Eastern Cape within the Amakhala Game Reserve, HillsNek has one of the best malaria-free safari experiences on the continent and has viewing opportunities for all of the Big Five. The area is also along the Garden Route, allowing nature lovers to appreciate the rich bounty of blooms. Families can stay in luxury “tents” that sleep up to four, and since there are only three such lodgings available, they can expect lots of privacy.

Gibb’s Farm, Tanzania

Situated next to coffee plantations and gorgeous gardens, Gibb’s Farm offers a taste of the relaxing country life in Africa. The lodge is also located exactly in between Ngorongoro Crater and Lake Manyara, allowing families to embark on expeditions to some of the most naturally and historically rich areas on the planet.

Find Even More Family Friendly African Safari Lodges

These are just some of the most notable family friendly lodging choices available in Africa. You can discover more options by looking at family safari vacation packages that cover the areas you want to see and the activities you want to do, or you can contact us to get our personal recommendations today.

Jill Liphart for www.rohoyachui.com 

 

Last Male Northern White Rhino Takes to Tinder to Find a Date

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There are only three northern white rhinos left, and just one male. As one of the last of his subspecies, Sudan the 44 year-old rhino did what any sensible person would do: create a Tinder profile and start looking for dates.

Sudan’s Tinder profile can now be found alongside others in 190 countries and 40 different languages. “I don’t mean to be too forward, but the fate of the species literally depends on me,” his profile quips, adding that he does “perform well under pressure.”

Ol Pejeta Conservancy, the caretakers of Sudan and his two female companions, started the campaign as an effort to raise money and awareness for the plight of the northern white rhino, also called the square-lipped rhino. The Conservancy also offers Kenya safari tours and lodging on their 90,000 acre facility.

So far, traffic for the Conservancy’s site has spiked, causing it to crash numerous times. No word yet on whether visitors are concerned conservationists, Sudan’s new adoring fans, or someone actually looking to get a date.

 

Sudan: Possibly the Last of His Subspecies

Sudan was born in 1973 — ironically the same year Marvin Gaye’s “Let’s Get It On” was a #1 single. He was captured in the wild in Sudan when he was only three years old and transported to the Dvůr Králové Zoo in the Czech republic. Sudan became the zoo’s rarest exhibited animal, drawing millions of interested visitors, photographers, zoologists and conservationists across the world every year.

The zoo successfully bred Sudan with a female northern white rhino named Nasima, giving birth to a male named Nabire in 1983 and a female named Najin in 1989. Nabire tragically died in his enclosure in 2015, but Najin went on to sire a female named Fatu in 2000.

Fatu, her mother and her grandfather Sudan were all transported to the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya in 2009 to give the rhinos a more natural habitat and hopefully encourage breeding with other partners. Their horns had grown in an abnormal shape because they had been rubbing them on the bars of their enclosures, so to encourage them to grow back normally — and to discourage poachers — all three rhinos had their horns safely sawn off once they reached their new home.

These rare specimens are protected around-the-clock from poachers by a team of vigilant and highly trained armed guards.

Looking for Love on Tinder

Unfortunately, neither of Sudan’s kin can breed any longer, and Suni, one of the last viable white rhino males they could breed with, perished in 2014. That means Sudan is the only one of his subspecies left who can produce viable, pure northern white rhino offspring.

His only options, then, are to cross-breed with other subspecies of square-lipped rhino, such as the southern white rhino. Or, perhaps he can dig up a saucy date with an elusive bachelorette northern white throughTinder? Although the chances of that actually happening are slim to none — no northern whites have been spotted in the wild since the early 2000s — Sudan’s profile will help raise awareness and money for other conservation efforts that benefit Ol Pejeta, Kenya, and the African wildlife community at large.

See White Rhinos on a Kenya Safari Tour

You can see white rhinos at Ol Pejeta Conservancy or at other amazing destinations when you book a rhino safari tour package to visit these majestic beasts in their home environment. Book your tour now, and start packing today!

Who knows, you just may be able to blow Sudan a kiss.

Jill Liphart for www.rohoyachui.com