Why You Should Go on a Safari in Winter


Contrary to what you might think, winter is one of the best times of the year to go on vacation. By taking a trip during the cooler months, you can break up the dreary winter season with a fun and exciting getaway, particularly if you make your next trip a winter safari.

Going on a safari is an exciting experience, regardless of the time of the year, but it is particularly memorable when your safari is also a winter vacation. Find out why a winter safari is your best choice for a vacation, and learn how you can easily plan your trip with help from a trusted company.

Cooler Temperatures

Although summer can be a great time to go on a safari, you will also have to deal with extremely high temperatures that can become dangerous if you’re not adequately prepared. For instance, summer temperatures in Africa are typically between 90 and 100 degrees Fahrenheit, if not higher.

Conversely, when you visit Africa in winter, you will experience much more comfortable temperatures, typically in the mid- to high-70s. With these temperatures, you can stay out in nature much longer and will have a more enjoyable experience. However, you should be sure to pack warm clothing, as the nighttime temperatures can get downright chilly.

Stay Dry

Many people plan safaris during the summer months to see as many exotic animals as possible. While this makes sense, popular tourist regions of Africa, such as Kruger, experience their rainy season during the summer. This means your safari adventures have a high probability of being washed out if you visit during the summer.

By booking your safari for the winter season, you will be able to avoid the wettest months of the year. Additionally, if you time your vacation correctly, you should still be able to see the breathtaking animal life for which Africa is known. Staying dry and having a great time is much easier when you go on a safari during the winter months.

Increased Safety

There are several hazards that you need to avoid on your African safari, including serious diseases like malaria. During the summer months in Africa, the mosquito population explodes, bringing an increased risk of malaria and other diseases transmitted by these insects.

Once the weather turns drier and cooler in certain regions of Africa, the number of mosquitoes drops substantially, meaning your trip will be much more enjoyable and with a lower risk of contracting malaria. If you want to make sure that your African safari is as safe as possible, consider booking a trip during the winter.

Beat the Crowds

One of the most frustrating aspects of vacationing in a popular destination is having to fight the crowds. A great reason to plan your African safari during winter is that the peak travel season will be over, meaning you’ll be able to enjoy the scenery and wildlife without having to navigate around large groups of tourists. Traveling during the winter season means having a much more relaxed vacation because you won’t have to deal with other vacationers.

Book your African safari during the winter if you want a cold weather getaway packed with thrills.

Jill Liphart for Roho Ya Chui

How to Take Gorgeous Safari Pictures

take dad on safari for fathers day

A key part of going on vacation is taking enough pictures so that you can remember your trip for years to come. While photography is an crucial part of any trip, it is particularly important when  you’re visiting a breathtakingly gorgeous location like Africa.

While on your African safari, you want to be sure that you take pictures that both look great and are an accurate reflection of your trip. Luckily, with the right tips at your disposal, photographing your African safari can be fun and easy. Here is some quick advice to help you take great safari pictures, and tips for planning the African safari that’s right for you and your family.

Lighting Tips

As any photographer knows, the key to taking a great picture is getting the right lighting. However, this can be especially difficult in Africa, where the light is much harsher and brighter than many people are used to. Instead of trying to adjust to this severe light, you should plan your picture taking for the times of day where the light is gentler. Taking pictures at dusk and dawn, for example, will result in beautiful pictures you’ll cherish for the rest of your life.

Planning your photographs for sunrise and sunset provides several benefits. First, as mentioned, the light is much more conducive to successful photography. Secondly, animals are much more active at these times of day, increasing your chances of a memorable shot.

Choose Your Shots

People going on safari for the first time often want to take as many pictures as possible, filling digital memory cards or rolls of film with thousands of pictures. While it’s understandable that you may want to take a photo of everything you see on safari, constantly taking photos can actually cause you to miss important sights, and may result in blurry, unattractive pictures.

When you’re taking safari pictures, you should be discerning about where and when you photograph. For example, if you see an animal in the shade, either wait for it to move into the light or give your camera time to adjust so that you can take a clear, attractive picture. Limiting the amount of pictures you take will help you stay present on your safari and will increase your chances of a fantastic photo.

Picking Your Equipment

One of the biggest mistakes that people make when they’re photographing Africa is choosing the wrong equipment. For instance, if you bring multiple lenses on your safari, then you may spend more time adjusting your camera than enjoying your trip. When it comes to taking pictures on your safari, less is always more.

Choose one lens for your camera so that you aren’t constantly tweaking your equipment. Also, instead of breaking the bank for an expensive camera, invest most of your money in a safari package that will let you experience the sites up close and personal. Not only will this ensure better pictures, but it will give you a more exciting safari.

Photographing Adventures

Another factor you should consider is whether you want to spend your entire safari looking through the viewfinder of your camera. An African safari is a once in a lifetime experience, and getting that perfect picture may not be worth what you missed. Consider reserving one day of your safari for picture taking, and then spend the rest of your trip immersing yourself in the natural beauty you’ll only find in Africa.

By sticking to these simple picture taking tips and making sure you have the right equipment, you can easily photograph your next African safari.

Jill Liphart for Roho Ya Chui

Why You Should Go on a Christmas Safari Holiday This Year

take dad on safari for fathers day

Christmas is a magical time of year for millions of people throughout the world, and it also happens to be the perfect time to go on an African safari tour with your family or closest friends.

In Africa, some describe December as the “rainy season,” but don’t expect torrential downpours and mud everywhere you go. In fact, many locals call this time of year the “green season” instead as frequent rains mean more vegetation. Animals get to dine voraciously, and most use the opportunity to sire a new generation. Tourism is also down, so prices tend to be deeply discounted to attract more people. These are just some of the reasons why Christmas safari holidays are an amazing experience and an alternative worth considering.

If you have always wanted to trade in a white Christmas for a green one filled with stunning wildlife and peaceful beaches, consider the following 5 reasons why you should go on a Christmas African safari holiday this year.

Less Crowds

In Southern and Eastern Africa, most safari game lodges and private reserves shut down to the public around mid to late January. This time of year coincides with the heaviest rains, which make roads muddy and difficult to traverse, even in the best of 4x4s.

In December, however, rains are frequent but light. Lodges, parks and reserves are all still accessible, yet bookings have already started to slack off. What this means is that you are far more likely to book a room at your favorite lodge during this time of year! You can also enjoy having fewer people on game drives as well as at airports and elsewhere near typical safari destinations.

You and your family can enjoy privacy and a more intimate experience at your lodge thanks to the thinned crowds and the eager staff ready to please their smaller pool of guests.

Cheaper Rates

As demand slows, prices go down in order to spur more business. Luxury game lodges near famous safari parks like Kruger, Mana Pools and the Serengeti tend to offer discounted rates, especially for big families. You can also receive special add-ons, like complimentary sundowners or a no-charge-added Christmas feast filled with African and European delights.

If you have always wanted to experience an African safari trip but were worried about your budget, Christmas time is the perfect period to visit most places at an affordable rate.

Tons of Adorable Newborn Animals

As greenery becomes plentiful, many animals in the bush take the opportunity to breed. Parks teem with adorable baby animals, like elephant calfs, lion cubs, wild dog pups, warthog piglets and more. Spotting these animals in the thicker, green grasses can be difficult, but many guides and trackers make it their specialty to locate young animals during the low season.

Incredible Greenery and Migratory Birds Galore

The rains and extra greenery create spectacular landscapes that truly show how Africa’s savannas and wetlands come alive. Migratory birds especially love this time of year in central to southern Africa, so bird lovers will get their fill of unique, exotic and spectacular birds at places like the Okavango Delta.

Milder Weather

Weather cools down during the rainy season quite a bit. In fact, many of the top non-safari destinations like Cape Town’s beaches and Lake Victoria resorts tend to have some of their best weather. The occasional thunderstorm is often followed by periods of blue skies, light breezes and plenty of sun.

Special Events and Celebrations

Game lodges know how special Christmas is to visitors, so they usually pull out all of the stops to prepare special holiday feasts or activities. Cities also often hold special events, like Johannesburg’s Christmas markets for gifts, crafts and seasonal treats. Events like these happen at no other time of the year, making Christmas a special and unique time to visit Africa on safari.

Book Your Christmas Safari Holiday in Africa Now!

Now is the perfect time to plan your trip to Africa for a special Christmas holiday adventure. Contact us today to book a custom Christmas safari vacation package, or look at our many available pre-planned African safari tour packages to get your season started off right.

Also, stay posted for a list of the absolute best things to do and places to visit on safari in Africa during Christmastime!

Jill Liphart for Roho Ya Chui

Going on Your First African Safari Trip? Here’s 8 Helpful Travel Tips


Africa has all sorts of wonderful experiences in store for first-time visitors, and with a few bits of advice from seasoned travellers, you can make the most of every moment. Learn what to do — and sometimes what not to do — when visiting the continent on your first African safari tour by reading on.


Research the History, Language and Culture of the Region You Are Going to Visit

Africa is the second-largest continent on the planet, big enough to fit the U.S., all of China, India, Japan and most of Europe within its borders. Just think for a moment about how different the culture is within regions of your own state, and you can begin to understand how diverse Africa is.

We say this so that you are able to appreciate the more unique aspects of the region you are visiting. Many first-time visitors make the mistake of thinking that “all Africa is alike” when regional differences can be quite stark.

To achieve the right frame of mind and prepare for deeper learning during your travels, take a second to look up the history of the country or major city you are visiting. For instance, you may learn that Kenya used to be under British rule until 1963, which can help you understand more about the country’s unique political beliefs. If you have more time, take a moment to look up the major languages spoken so that you can catch more subtext within the signage and snippets of conversation you hear.


Bring an Old Cell Phone, Outlet Adapter, and a Spare Power Bank

Your normal cell phone service likely won’t work abroad, but you can always purchase a cheap SIM card and prepaid service in the country where you arrive. Buy an unlocked phone off eBay or Craigslist, and make sure it is fully charged and loaded with important contacts before your trip begins. Taking this phone with you reduces the risk that your personal phone could get lost or stolen.

Also, be sure to have an outlet adapter for the shape of the outlet of the country you will be entering as well as spare power bank chargers.


Spread Your Money and Cards Around

When travelling, don’t keep all of your money and cards in a single place. Keep some in a body wallet worn close to you, and spread the rest around in secure, easy-to-find locations. That way, you are less likely to misplace or lose all of your funds, and you still have access to money even in a worst-case scenario.


Will Your Way Through Jet Lag

Jet lag is mostly a state of mind, so fighting your body’s internal clock can help you adjust more quickly. No matter what time you are used to doing things, force yourself to eat and sleep on a normal schedule during your stay. The more you can warm up to the new time zone, the better-able you will be able to enjoy things like early morning bush walks.

As an added trick: set your wristwatch to the new time zone you will be visiting a week before your trip to start gearing up mentally.


Write Down the Name and Number of a Good Driver

Ask your hotel front desk or game lodge manager if they know of a reliable transit service, or, better yet, the name and number of a trustworthy driver.

Finding a good cab driver in a major city like Johannesburg is like knowing your own personal superhero. You can give them a call to catch a reliable ride anywhere you need to go, and they will often drop what they are doing to pick up an out-of-town customer since they can earn more from them.


Learn More Advice, and Book Your African Safari Tour Now!

You can learn more tips for travelling, enjoying your safari and making the most of your African experience when you contact us today for personalized advice on how you can craft the perfect safari holiday experience. Take a look at some of our sample African safari vacation packages to see what could be in store for you.

Jill Liphart for Roho Ya Chui

All About the Hyrax, the Elephant’s Cousin That Looks Like a Rodent


In a continent full of unique and unusual animals, the plucky hyrax still manages to stand out. These medium-sized mammals are survivors of a primitive group of species that later split off to evolve into elephants, manatees and dugongs. They have some interesting characteristics, including complex barking “songs” and elephant-like rubbery footpads adapted for climbing.

You can find the four different species of hyrax all throughout Africa during an African safari tour. Observing them in the wild is a rare treat that makes them every bit as worth seeking out as any of the Big Five.

The Four Species of Hyrax

There are four different species of hyrax — also called “dassies” by those who speak Afrikaans — and they all have their own distinct habits and habitat ranges.

  • Rock Hyrax — Also called the “rock badger,” these hyraxes are highly social and adept climbers thanks to their thick rubber-like pads. They spend 95% of their time sleeping or resting in the sun.
    • Distribution: Cape Hyraxes are found along the coasts of South Africa and Namibia as well as across Sub-Saharan Africa
  • Yellow-Spotted Hyrax — Also called the “bush hyrax” or the “yellow-spotted rock hyrax” this species lives in clusters of boulders and rocky natural outcroppings found on the plains called kopjes. They are smaller and less-round than the rock hyrax.
    • Distribution: Found along the eastern coast of Africa and also within limited areas of Angola.
  • Western Tree Hyrax — Unlike the social rock hyraxes, this hyrax tends to live alone within tree clusters. They have coarser fur and unique white markings that resemble eyebrows or beards.
    • Distribution: Found in a limited range in western subtropical Africa, including the D.R. Congo and southern Cameroon.
  • Southern Tree Hyrax — The most elusive and smallest of the hyrax species, the southern tree hyrax lives alone or in pairs. They prefer humid regions of forests and savannas as well as rocky areas.
    • Distribution: A limited range in east-central Africa, including most of Tanzania and parts of the D.R. Congo.

Hyrax Size and Appearance

Hyraxes appear similar to rodents or guinea pigs, with the rock hyrax looking rather rotund and the other species looking more-lean. They can grow up to 28 inches in length and 11 pounds.

Hyraxes have interesting teeth structures, with front incisors that grow out into tusk-like formations, similar to their elephant cousins. They also have hoof-like blunt nails that resemble elephant feet.

Hyrax Group Behaviors

The two rock hyrax species are highly social, living in groups of up to 30. As a result of their social organization, they show signs of high intelligence, including the ability to communicate through 20 different vocal noises. In captivity, they tend to be extremely “talkative,” responding actively to caregivers when they approach. They also make chomping/chewing movements as a form of communication.

Unique Adaptations

All hyrax species have unique foot pad structures and sweat glands in between their toes to help them grip rocks and tree trunks. The foot muscles all curve inward to create a suction-cup-like grip.

Another interesting adaptation is the hyrax’s highly efficient kidneys, which can filter waste with minimal use of water. In fact, their concentrated urine creates mineral deposits over time called hyraceum, and the musky scent is highly prized as an ingredient in perfumes.

One thing the hyraxes are not well-adapted for is maintaining their internal heat. Rock hyraxes in particular must huddle together, rest frequently and bask in the sun to maintain their internal body temperature.

See Rock Hyraxes and Other Incredible Species During Your African Safari Tour

You can encounter hyraxes and other charming, unique creatures during your African safari trip when you book one of our safari tour packages.

Take a look at our sample safari tours to book your trip today, and contact us if you want to create a custom safari vacation where you can meet hyraxes in person.

Jill Liphart for Roho Ya Chui


Meet Africa’s Plucky “Small Five” During Your Safari Adventure


Much attention is given to Africa’s “Big Five” game animals — and deservedly so — but those who come to Africa to look at just five species will miss out on incredible opportunities to see other beautiful wildlife.

Tackling this problem, conservationists decided to band together and make a push to recognize the not­so­big and not­quite­so­iconic animals you can find throughout the continent. The result was the “Small Five.”

None of these creatures are particularly rare, but they do feature names from each of the Big Five as a clever nod. The real purpose in highlighting these animals is to help people headed to top­rated African safari destinations focus on all the small details that make Africa great, not just Five of them.

Get to know the Little Five and what makes them so endearing by reading their species profiles below.


1.   Red­Billed Buffalo Weaver

The buffalo weaver lives in large colonies on savannas south of the Sahara all throughout Africa. Each colony is made up of breeding groups of 3­4 females and one male. The groups make huge nests in baobab trees and other plains trees on the savanna. Each nest contains multiple compartments for individual females to lay eggs and nest upon them.

Even though males often compete for female mates, and females do not tolerate other females in their chamber, red­billed buffalo weavers do cooperate when it comes to building their large nests. Males will even cooperate with one another to build nests, gather food for females and defend the colony territory from invaders.


2.   Elephant Shrew

The elephant shrew is a fascinating creature known for their long snouts and rapid speeds. Even though the animals typically measure less than a foot in length, they can sprint at speeds of nearly 18 miles an hour for short distances.

Some species even modify their environment by clearing “lanes” or paths through the underbrush to make finding insects easier. They can also use the cleared lanes to rapidly scurry to safety when a threat comes near.

3.   Leopard Tortoise

Named for the vibrant leopard­like patterns sometimes seen on their hard domed shells, leopard tortoises are desert­loving reptiles found from Sudan all the way to the southern Cape. They eat grasses but prefer desert succulents and spiny thistles, making quick work of them with their leathery tongues.

Leopard tortoises are the fourth­largest species of tortoise in the world, growing up to 16 inches in overall length and 29 pounds in weight. Some tortoises along the Cape have gotten even bigger, growing to 28 inches and weighing more than 88 pounds!

4.   Rhinoceros Beetle

Africa has over a dozen species of rhinoceros beetle throughout its lands, including the huge Archon centaurus at nearly three inches long and Oryctes boas, which has a single horn large enough to make even a real rhino jealous!

Both male and female rhino beetles have horns, but only the males use them to battle for mates. They also use the horn as real rhinos do: to dig, lift objects and help navigate their environment. When threatened, some rhino beetle species “squeak” by rubbing their abdomens against their thin inner wings.

5.   Ant Lion

The most­common of the Little Five but nonetheless fascinating, the ant lion species can be found all throughout Africa and the world. These voracious insect predators are actually the larva of lacewing insects. They burrow into the ground and make trademark “funnel traps” in the sand to capture unsuspecting insect prey. Antlions’ powerful jaws can seize prey many times their size, and their large abdomens and forward­facing bristles help keep them anchored during the struggle.

Africa is home to some of the largest antlion species, including one species of Palpares that grows to 6.3 inches as an adult!

Come Meet the Small Five at Top­Rated African Safari Destinations

When you book a safari destination vacation package, feel free to get excited about lion, leopard and elephant sightings, but don’t forget to take a closer look at the world around you. You just may see an ant lion funnel, or catch the call of a buffalo weaver as they exit their large nests.

Take a second to appreciate all of Africa in this way, and you will get much more out of your trip to come home feeling like you truly experienced as much splendor as possible.

Jill Liphart for Roho Ya Chui


Where to Visit Africa in August


Africa’s predictable seasons make planning your African safari tour easy. Different parts of the continent have peak visiting times throughout the year for various attractions, helping you pick the most astonishing and memorable activities to take part in during your trip depending on the time you choose.

If you aim to visit Africa in August, for instance, it is the perfect time for both viewing wild game and experiencing some of the most incredible cities on the continent. To help you plan your trip, take a look at the following exciting places to see and activities you can do there.


August means that the long, dry winter season in southern Africa is finally winding to a close. During the course of the winter, a lack of rain causes much of the vegetation to die and the temporary water holes to deplete.

This may not sound like the most scenic time to visit, but less vegetation means it will be easier to spot animals that are unable to hide in the tall summer grasses. A lack of water also means that many animals like elephants, lions, gazelle and antelope will all gather near the remaining rivers and permanent water holes, creating spectacular interactions and perfect photo ops.

To get the best viewing in Botswana during your August safari, make sure to visit Chobe National Park and the Moremi Game Reserve.


Winter in Africa can bring some surprisingly chilly winds and frigid nights. In August, these temperatures finally begin to inch their way back up, creating the perfect in-between weather for a light jacket and mild days.

There may be no better time on the calendar to visit the deserts of Namibia. You can take sunrise pictures of the towering dunes to capture magnificent photos worthy of a National Geographic spread.

Cape Town, South Africa

Mild weather makes Cape Town a veritable paradise in August. The incredible wildflowers of Table Mountain first begin to bloom around this time, and many wineries are just beginning to roll out the red carpet for Spring’s slew of guests.

Whale watching is also incredible during this time of year. Many pods of southern right whales converge upon South Africa’s coast to calve during this time, offering one of the best opportunities of the year to see them breaching with their mates and newborn calves.


Travelling to Zambia in August offers a fair mix of weather and small crowds as the area’s bush camps begin to prepare for their busy season. Mana Pools National Park is a great place to visit during this time as there are few mosquitos, the days are often clear and wildlife viewing is optimal thanks to the thinned vegetation.

You could also travel to South Luangwa National Park for a unique canoeing safari trip where you can get up close and personal with some of the continent’s most iconic animals.

Lake Malawi

The start of spring also happens to be amazing beach weather, giving you a wonderful excuse to explore the crystal clear blue waters of Lake Malawi on a sailboat or kayak.

Book Your August African Safari Tour Now to Save

Booking your African safari tour for August right now can give you the perfect opportunity to save on lodging and game viewing rates. As the peak tourism season approaches, many game lodges and camps still struggle with vacancies and sometimes offer incentives to fill their books.

Take a look at our sample African safari tour itineraries to get an idea of the amazing time you could be having on your luxurious African vacation in August.

Jill Liphart for Roho Ya Chui