Secrets of Namibia: Explore the Skeleton Coast

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You can find the Skeleton Coast in the northern part of South Africa’s Namibia coast. It stretches alongside the Atlantic Ocean, south of Angola from the Kunene River. Over time, it has been referred to as “the gates of hell.” But the Skeleton Coast isn’t just a destination for horror fanatics. In fact, despite the storied history of crashed vessels and shipwrecks, the Skeleton Coast is popular today as an excellent place for surfing.

Curious about the history of the Skeleton Coast? Eager to hit the waves? Explore the Skeleton Coast of Namibia on your African safari journey and take home a story to remember!

About The Skeleton Coast

The Skeleton Coast gets its name from a myriad of sources. For one, when the whaling industry was at its peak, whale and seal bones littered the shore, leaving literal skeletons behind as the rest of the animals were harvested. Today, a different type of carcass can also be stumbled upon: rusting ships and boat debris from the numerous accidents and tragedies that have befallen sailors who took on the seas while unprepared, battling intense winds and shifting currents as well as a cold, dense fog.

One of these vessels, the MV Dunedin Star, ran aground in 1942. A complicated but successful mission saved all of its passengers and crew, and the historical rescue was documented in a novel by John Henry Marsh, published in 1944. The book’s title? Skeleton Coast. The name has stuck to maps and with locals ever since.

Exclusive Shores

The Skeleton Coast National Park contains the most inaccessible shores, seized by a combination of harsh weather conditions, loose sands and massive shipwrecks. To best navigate the coast, the park is divided into two sections, north and south. The southern section can be traversed by 4-wheel drive vehicles, and you can drive as far up as the Ugab River Gate before the terrain becomes too dangerous. The northern section can only be explored by plane.

Salt Pans, Clay Castles and Seal Colonies

But it’s not just a bleak history tour. In the northern half of the park, you can visit the Agate Mountain salt pans and the clay castles of the Hoarusib River for some breathtaking views or ideal photography opportunities. For an extra delight, you can also go to Cape Fria and see a huge seal colony, with almost 50,000 seals taking advantage of the fish and plankton that fill the waters.

Epic Surfing Spots

Then, in the southern region, grab a surfboard and join the many thrill seekers in the ocean. Swells consistently hit along the Skeleton Coast and, with enough training and tact, you can find some epic spots to surf. The water produces waves in fast and thick bursts, with strong tidal rips crashing in. Follow the line of surfers from May to September and keep an eye out for sharks — for surfer enthusiasts, the experience will be well worth it!

Namibia Safari Tours: See More of Africa

It sounds brutal, but despite its perilous reputation, the Skeleton Coast is a beautiful spot to discover — and certainly unique as a tourist destination. Some tours can be costly, particularly to the northern region of the park, where extra travel precautions must be taken. However, a trip to the Skeleton Coast will more than make up for it with the exclusivity of experiencing one of the best kept secrets of Namibia.

So what are you waiting for? Namibia safari tour packages are available right now and can be customized however you choose. Earn your bragging rights by braving the Skeleton Coast. Or, at the very least, make friends with some seals. Book your trip today!

Jill Liphart for Roho Ya Chui

Where to Visit Africa in August

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Africa’s predictable seasons make planning your African safari tour easy. Different parts of the continent have peak visiting times throughout the year for various attractions, helping you pick the most astonishing and memorable activities to take part in during your trip depending on the time you choose.

If you aim to visit Africa in August, for instance, it is the perfect time for both viewing wild game and experiencing some of the most incredible cities on the continent. To help you plan your trip, take a look at the following exciting places to see and activities you can do there.

Botswana

August means that the long, dry winter season in southern Africa is finally winding to a close. During the course of the winter, a lack of rain causes much of the vegetation to die and the temporary water holes to deplete.

This may not sound like the most scenic time to visit, but less vegetation means it will be easier to spot animals that are unable to hide in the tall summer grasses. A lack of water also means that many animals like elephants, lions, gazelle and antelope will all gather near the remaining rivers and permanent water holes, creating spectacular interactions and perfect photo ops.

To get the best viewing in Botswana during your August safari, make sure to visit Chobe National Park and the Moremi Game Reserve.

Namibia

Winter in Africa can bring some surprisingly chilly winds and frigid nights. In August, these temperatures finally begin to inch their way back up, creating the perfect in-between weather for a light jacket and mild days.

There may be no better time on the calendar to visit the deserts of Namibia. You can take sunrise pictures of the towering dunes to capture magnificent photos worthy of a National Geographic spread.

Cape Town, South Africa

Mild weather makes Cape Town a veritable paradise in August. The incredible wildflowers of Table Mountain first begin to bloom around this time, and many wineries are just beginning to roll out the red carpet for Spring’s slew of guests.

Whale watching is also incredible during this time of year. Many pods of southern right whales converge upon South Africa’s coast to calve during this time, offering one of the best opportunities of the year to see them breaching with their mates and newborn calves.

Zambia

Travelling to Zambia in August offers a fair mix of weather and small crowds as the area’s bush camps begin to prepare for their busy season. Mana Pools National Park is a great place to visit during this time as there are few mosquitos, the days are often clear and wildlife viewing is optimal thanks to the thinned vegetation.

You could also travel to South Luangwa National Park for a unique canoeing safari trip where you can get up close and personal with some of the continent’s most iconic animals.

Lake Malawi

The start of spring also happens to be amazing beach weather, giving you a wonderful excuse to explore the crystal clear blue waters of Lake Malawi on a sailboat or kayak.

Book Your August African Safari Tour Now to Save

Booking your African safari tour for August right now can give you the perfect opportunity to save on lodging and game viewing rates. As the peak tourism season approaches, many game lodges and camps still struggle with vacancies and sometimes offer incentives to fill their books.

Take a look at our sample African safari tour itineraries to get an idea of the amazing time you could be having on your luxurious African vacation in August.

Jill Liphart for Roho Ya Chui

Options for Travelling Within Africa

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Once you reach Africa for your safari vacation, you have many options at your disposal for travelling around the continent. Some of them are cheap, some are comfortable, some are quick, some are convenient, and some are very safe. Few offer all five.

You must decide your own priorities when trying to arrange transportation within the country you arrive at. The following are some of the options you may have for travelling on your African safari tour along with their respective pros and cons.

Train

Riding by train is one of the few options that can check off most of the needed boxes. In most areas, it’s quick, incredibly cheap, often borderline luxurious, and definitely safe. The only issue is that it may not be convenient since train service is limited to the number of rails available.

Going between common destinations like Pretoria and Cape Town is a perfect fit for travelling across southern Africa by train. But when you need to travel north to areas with less-developed infrastructure, things can literally get a bit more rickety. Therefore, make sure to research the reputation of the rail service you intend to use to ensure you will get the level of service you expect.

Charter Bus

Charter bus services like Baz Bus are perfectly oriented towards tourists and backpackers. They offer direct service to common destinations, including trips between Johannesburg and major cities like Port Elizabeth and Cape Town. Tickets offer convenient hop-on, hop-off service, including unlimited rides within a set time period.

The only issue is that longer trips can get fairly steep, above $150, and that few of these trips bring you to game reserves and parks. Nevertheless, a charter bus is a great alternative to flying or trains.

Minivan Taxis

If you want a true African experience and plenty of harrowing moments, then a minivan taxi is for you.

Be warned that drivers pack in far more people than the official number of seats, and they also tend to drive as fast as possible, even when it may not be the safest decision. They also tend to wait around until the van is packed full, so if you do want to enjoy a cheap but thrilling adventure, try to find a van already near-full to avoid waiting an hour or more to depart.

Public Bus

Public bus routes in South Africa and other countries are much safer and more comfortable than you would expect. They also happen to be quite lively, so expect to make plenty of new friends and hear some interesting conversations.

Bus stops within certain neighborhoods of big cities may be less than comforting, though, so be wary of where you get on and off. Also, research the bus service in the particular country you visit to make sure it is safe and can provide the needed level of service.

Renting a Car

Driving in certain areas, like along the Garden Route, is a once-in-a-lifetime experience. But you do not usually want to drive around cities like Johannesburg on your own since traffic laws can be more fast and loose than you may be accustomed to.

Prices for renting cars can also vary according to your duration or the amount of miles you intend to travel, so weigh the freedom of driving yourself against the cost and the stress of navigating certain areas on your own.

Plane

Flying within Africa can be quite cheap, but make sure you end up close to your destination. For instance, you may be able to find flights from Cape Town to Gaborone for cheaper than the price of renting a car, but you will still be many miles from Chobe National Park or the Moremi Game Reserve. Weigh the total cost of your trip when flying, and you could end out still finding a deal.

Using an African Safari Tour Package

Of course, the most simple way to ensure all of your travel needs are met within a reasonable budget is to book your trip through a safari travel service like Roho Ya Chui. We plan the optimal transportation option for you to make your trip memorable and safe while still getting you where you want to go at a reasonable time and price.

Take a look at our various safari tour packages to see how convenient it is to allow a service like ours to make all the hard decisions for you, and then book your trip soon!

Jill Liphart for Roho Ya Chui

 

7 Small Cats of Africa That Need Your Love, Too

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Africa’s lions, leopards and cheetahs are absolutely breathtaking in every sense of the word, but they are not the only fabulous felines the continent has to offer. In fact, there are seven other species of wild cats that can be found during an African safari vacation.

While these kitties may be smaller than their larger counterparts, they are no less beautiful or fascinating. Many of them actually happen to have some fairly astounding abilities, like leaping 10 feet into the air! Read on to learn more about seven small cats of Africa that need your love, too.

Caracal

Caracals are gorgeous, medium-sized wild cats recognizable by the tall black tufts they sport on their ears. They stand about 18 inches at the shoulder and weigh up to 40 pounds.

While caracals may be best known for their wispy ears, they have an even more impressive quality: they are some of the world’s best jumpers. An adult caracal can leap up to 10 feet in the air in order to catch elusive prey like pheasants and other birds. The ancient Egyptians even once tamed caracals to use for hunting.

Spotting a caracal is difficult because they are mostly nocturnal, solitary and shy, but they can potentially be found throughout grasslands in southern and eastern Africa.

Serval

A serval is another medium-sized African cat. This species often looks like a large version of housecat but with longer legs and a stunning spotted coat. In fact, the serval has the longest legs relative to body size of any cat. They typically stand around 20 inches at the shoulder and weigh 30 to 40 pounds.

Although they are still shy, you can find servals more easily than caracals. They have a wide-ranging habitat stretching across central Africa and reaching along the east coast all the way down to the Cape of Good Hope.

African Golden Cat

The African Golden Cat is an incredibly rare and beautiful medium-sized cat that lives almost exclusively in the forests of the Congo, with some subspecies also being found along swathes of the west African coast.

This species is reddish-brown, and about twice the size of a typical domestic cat, weighing up to 35 lbs. Seeing an African golden cat is truly a rare treat that can make safaris in the Congo and East Africa well worth the trip.

African Wildcat

If you spot a creature stalking in the Savannah that looks like it could be a large stray, look a little closer. There is a solid chance that this may actually be an African wildcat, the species that was domesticated to become a common housecat.

True African wildcats have a longer, lankier, and more muscular build compared to a housecat. Their shoulder blades also protrude more noticeably, like a cheetah’s. All have a faint grey tabby pattern.

With a wide range stretching across most of Africa, they are also very common in the wild. And, like most regular cats, they definitely won’t come when you call them!

Black Footed Cat

Black-footed cats are tiny, spotted cats that are found predominantly in arid regions of South Africa. Weighing less than six pounds on average and at a standard size half that of a typical domestic cat, black-footed cats may be the smallest wild cat species in the world.

They typically hunt at night and rest during the day in abandoned burrows dug by animals like aardvarks. Their small size means they must hunt voraciously every night to maintain their energy — an adult black-footed cat may catch as many as 14 small animals a night!

Cats of North Africa

  • The Sand Cat is a small cat adapted to life in the desert, with thick paw pads and large ears used to detect vibrations caused by small prey.
  • The Jungle Cat is rare in Africa, only found near the Nile in Egypt, but found more commonly in the jungles of southern Asia. They live mostly in wetland habitats, hunting with large fangs.

Come Get to Know Africa’s Small Cats on an African Safari Vacation

You can potentially meet Africa’s small cats in person — and ensure they get the spotlight they need to shine alongside their big cousins — when you book an African safari vacation package today.

Jill Liphart for Roho Ya Chui

6 Facts about Lake Malawi Will Make You Go Get Your Snorkel Gear

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Lake Malawi is an incredibly gorgeous place unlike anywhere else on Earth. The stunning lake is home to hundreds of cichlid species, picturesque still waters and a community of friendly locals eager to warmly greet new visitors.

Explaining all that makes Lake Malawi unique and worth visiting on a Malawi safari tour could take a lifetime, so here is a smattering of the six most interesting facts about the lake to encourage to come visit and explore.

1. It’s One of the Biggest Lakes in the World

Lake Malawi is officially the ninth-biggest lake in the world and the third-biggest lake in Africa. At 11,400 square feet of surface, Lake Malawi is large enough to fit the state of Massachusetts within its shores!

The lake can also plunge surprisingly deep, with its deepest point reaching 2,316 feet, or nearly a half mile.

2.  It Has the Highest Number of Fish Species of Any Lake in the World, Including Over 700 Cichlids

Lake Malawi’s biggest celebrities are the colorful cichlid fish that teem near its shores. Biologists estimate that there could be over 700 different cichlid species, and we have only begun to scratch the surface of recording and categorizing all of them.

There are also many other interesting species, including the spotted Mochokidae catfish and the neon-tinged African tetra.

3. It Was Formed Around 2 Million Years Ago From a Rift in the Earth

Lake Malawi sits on the bottom of a massive geological formation known as the East African Rift. This rift was formed when tectonic plate underneath the African continent shifted, changing the flow of rivers and causing many bodies of water to form, including Lake Victoria and the tributaries of the Nile.

4. Its Waters Stay in Stratified Layers That Never Mix

Most lakes have warm and cool waters that churn over the course of the seasons, mixing up oxygen and sediments while causing dynamic changes throughout the year. Instead, Lake Malawi forms layers of water that never change, making it what geologists call a “meromictic lake.”

These distinct and unchanging water layers make Lake Malawi incredibly clear and blue, and they may have also helped drive speciation within the diverse cichlid populations.

5. Explorer Dr. Livingstone Called It the “Lake of Stars”

Lake Malawi was first discovered by Europeans in 1846 when Portuguese traders stumbled upon it. The famous explorer David Livingstone later charted the Lake’s shores and gave it the nickname of “the Lake of Stars” because of the lanterns upon fishing canoes that twinkled like stars in the night.

The Lake of Stars is now the name of a popular music festival occurring on the shores of Lake Malawi.

6. It Was the Site of the First Naval “Battle” of World War I

Legend has it that a British gunboat patrolling Lake Malawi, the SS Gwendolen, scored the U.K.’s first naval victory of World War I when it captured the German vessel Hermann von Wissmann. In truth, the Gwendolen’s Captain Rhoades made no attempt to sink the Wissman and instead snuck up on the vessel and fired one warning shot.

The crews of both ships were drinking buddies who would frequently partake in parties involving copious amounts of Malawi’s famous local gin. Allegedly, the captain of the Wissmann responded to the warning shot by shouting: “God d***, Rhoades, are you drunk?”

While the Wissmann was never scuttled, scuba divers can still find many shipwrecks within the deep, clear waters of Lake Malawi where cichlids and other fish claim new homes.

Come Explore Lake Malawi on a Malawi Safari Tour!

Boating, canoeing, water-skiing, swimming, snorkeling, scuba diving or just relaxing on the beach with a locally made gin and tonic can all be possible when you visit Lake Malawi as part of your African safari tour package. The lake is also home to African fish eagles, crocodiles, elephants, hippopotamus, monkeys and many other captivating species.

Come see everything the incredible lake and the national park on its southern shores can offer when you book your safari adventure today!

Jill Liphart for Roho Ya Chui

image: Chintheche Inn

What do Wild Lions Do All Day?

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With their lithe, muscular bodies, flowing manes and breathtaking eyes that seem to pierce with their gaze, lions are no doubt one of the single-most beautiful creatures on the planet. But just what the heck do they do all day when they live out in the wild?

If you have ever been on a trip with an African safari tour operator, you would see that a lions’ typical agenda appears quite similar to the average housecat. They sleep most of the day, play and interact with one another, and spend large amounts of time stalking and hunting prey. Of course, when the lion tends to do it, it looks a lot more majestic!

You can learn the specifics of the average lion’s routine as well as some interesting facts about lions by reading on.

Sleeping and Resting — 16-20 Hours a Day

Lions are fairly massive creatures, with the average female weigh nearly 300 pounds and the average male around 420 pounds. They also tend to spend a slim but important part of their day in vigorous physical activity, hunting, meaning they use up a lot of energy all at once.

To help build up these energy levels and maintain all that mass on a somewhat scarce diet, the typical lion will lounge around during most of the daylight hours. They will alternate between sunny and shaded areas, usually relegating themselves to a chosen section of their overall territory for a number of days.

If the females happen to have cubs, they will establish a temporary den and play area for the entire pride to get their rest around while protecting the young brood.

Grooming, Socializing, Playing and Exploring — 1-2 Hours a Day

Most of the awake time lions spend actively is divided between eating and what one might call social or leisure activities. At dusk, lions are the most active, grooming one another, interacting and finding places to go defecate. Lions may also play or interact with one another in bursts of activity leading up to the nightly hunt.

Walking, Searching for Prey — 2 Hours a Day

The most time-consuming activity on a lion’s agenda besides sleeping is walking. Lions spend around two hours a day on average patrolling their territory, looking for both prey and competitors. They may also be exploring looking for new sources of shelter, water or places to establish a temporary den for cubs. Lionesses will relocate cubs to a new den once every few weeks to ensure that the vulnerable cubs do not build up a scent for predators to notice.

Lions may shift to new parts of their territory as they patrol it, or they may return to their lounging site once they are done hunting and eating for the day.

Hunting — Less Than 10 Minutes a Day

Not counting the time lions spend locating and stalking prey, they dedicate very little time doing actual hunting. Lions are large and often noticeable, so their strategy is to flank their prey and encroach slowly. They must get very close before performing a short, powerful strike, usually at the end of a burst of speed.

Lionesses typically spend their time hunting in the early hours of dawn while males watch after the cubs.

Eating — Around 50 Minutes a Day

To preserve their body mass and get the need nutrition, adult male lions must consume around 15 lbs of meat a day and adult lionesses 11 lbs. Small prey is usually consumed quickly on site by the lion who earned the kill, while larger prey is shared in groups. Eating and protecting kills also spends up a large portion of the their energy, so they will often go home with full bellies and no stamina left, leading to another daily session of legendary naps.

Come See Lions With a Safari Tour Operator

Lions can be readily seen in many of Africa’s most popular parks, including Kruger National Park in South Africa. Their trademark naps can be observed on game drives as sleepy lions sprawl out near paved roads in the early morning. Nighttime hunts can be rarely spotted, but going on a nighttime walking safari can help you see lions when they are more active.

Come take an up-close look at wild lions by booking a safari tour package today!

Jill Liphart for www.rohoyachui.com

Top 5 African Street Foods to Try

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Part of the joy of encountering new countries and cultures is trying the delicious food they make hot and fresh for a quick meal or mid-day treat. Compared to typical dishes a family might cook at home, these street foods are simple and indulgent. They are also usually quite easy to eat, making them perfect for a pick-me-up or a meal on-the-go.

Note that eating at street stalls can be risky for your health compared to an established restaurant, but there are strategies you can use to reduce your risks.

For those on an African safari vacation who have the stomach to give them a try, the following street foods will have them smacking their lips and dreaming about their next trip:

Bobotie

Bobotie is a South African dish with roots that go back to Ancient Rome. The dish is prepared with sweet and spicy mincemeat, usually containing finely minced beef and lamb mixed with chopped almonds and dried fruit. This mixture is heavily spiced with curry powder as well as ginger, marjoram and lemon rind, giving it a complex aroma and a delicious contrast of flavors.

This mincemeat preparation is cooked for hours and then topped with a mixture of scrambled eggs and milk-soaked bread, creating a gooey topping that soaks up all the lovely juices from the mincemeat.

Street vendors serve up bobotie in big slabs held within paper trays, but the dish is also served in restaurants with a side of yellow rice and veggies.

Kelewele

Simple and satisfying, this Ghanaian snack takes fried plantains and covers it in a dusting of powdered cayenne, ginger and salt. The result is savory, golden-brown crispy outsides and a soft, semi-sweet interior.

People usually eat kelewele as a side dish with meats or stews, but it can also be eaten on its own as a snack.

Mofo Gasy

If you love sweet breakfast treats, then you just may be dreaming about mofo gasy after your first experience. This specialty bread is made in Madagascar and has since spread to parts of the eastern mainland. It is made with rice flour, sweetened condensed milk, yeast and vanilla and then slowly grilled over charcoals. The resulting pastries are sweet, fluffy and crispy on the outside, and they go great with fresh-cut fruit and a mug of strong coffee!

The Boerie Roll

South Africa’s German influences come alive in this spice-laden beef sausage stuffed with allspice, clove, nutmeg and coriander. These sausages are grilled until crispy and served on a crunchy baguette loaf for the ultimate hearty mid-day meal.

Suya

Possibly Nigeria’s favorite dish, suya is a barbequed preparation of marinated strips of fish, beef, chicken or offal. The meats are steeped in a mixture of paprika, ginger, onion powder and ground peanuts for several hours before getting charred over hot flames. The crispy results are sweet, spicy and easy to put down, making eating just a few difficult!

Try These Delicious Foods and More on an African Safari Vacation

See some of the world’s most magical animals and eat some of its best foods when you book an African safari vacation package today.

Jill Liphart for www.rohoyachui.com