Best South African Safari Activities on a Budget

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Although there are a variety of locations you could visit on your next African safari, South Africa is the best choice if you want as much fun and excitement on your trip as possible. There are a countless things to see and do in South Africa, and whether you’re looking for relaxation or adventure, you’ll be able to find an activity that’s right for you.

While visiting South Africa is a great choice for anyone planning their next vacation, it’s a particularly good option for those traveling on a budget. The country is filled with great activities that you can book for a low-cost, making for the ideal vacation. Here are a few of the most exciting, cost-effective activities in South Africa that you should consider when you’re planning your next African safari vacation.

One of the World’s Highest Jumps

If you’re a thrill seeker, then there’s almost no better place to visit in South Africa, particularly if you’re looking to save money on your trip. South Africa provides many opportunities for pulse bounding fun, including some of the best bungee jumping options in the entire world.

Bloukrans Bungee is known as the highest bridge bungee jumping opportunity in the entire world, and is a can’t miss activity in this popular safari destination. Best of all, bungee jumping from this location is extremely affordable. Whether you’re an experienced bungee jumper or have always wanted to try this activity, Bloukrans Bungee is a great South African recreational opportunity.

Take an Extended Trip in Kruger Park

When your primary reason for going on safari is seeing Africa’s big five, then there’s no better place in South Africa, particularly when you visit Kruger National Park. One of the most popular spots in all of Africa, Kruger National Park is a location that you must experience for yourself, and is one of the best places in the world to your exotic animal life.

To see all that Kruger National Park has to offer, you should consider taking a five-day safari tour, which is surprisingly affordable and will provide you plenty of time to explore the park and see every member of Africa’s big five.

Ride the Orange River

Spending some time on the water is a great choice wherever you’re planning your next vacation, but if you choose to book a safari in South Africa, you’ll be able to enjoy world-class rafting on the gorgeous Orange River.

The Orange River is the longest in all of South Africa, and offers some of the most beautiful scenery anywhere in the country. While rafting down this river, you’ll be able to forget about the stresses of your everyday life while seeing some of the most beautiful sites that you’ve ever experienced. A four-day trip down the orange river is an affordable, unforgettable activity that you should be sure to book for your next South African safari.

South Africa is home to almost limitless activities, even if you’re traveling on a budget. Think about what you want out of your next vacation, and you should be able to choose a few budget friendly options that will guarantee you have the most fun-filled African safari vacation possible.

Jill Liphart for Roho Ya Chui

Game Reserves and National Parks: What’s the Difference?

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When you’re planning to go on African safari, it’s likely that your main goal is to spend time in nature and see some of the most beautiful plant and animal life in the world. However, many people going on safari for the first time aren’t quite sure how to best accomplish this goal.

For instance, while researching your safari, you’ll probably see references to national parks, wilderness areas, game reserves, and conservancy, making it hard to know which you should visit for the most enjoyable safari experience possible. Here is some information to help you learn the difference between game reserves and national parks so you can easily plan an African safari.

Enjoy a National Park

If you want to enjoy nature in Africa in a more controlled environment, then your best bet is to visit a national park. As you might expect from their name, national parks are owned and operated by the government of the country where they are located, and are a great way for safari goers to safely experience wildlife in Africa.

Generally, national parks will offer a variety of activities such as guided tours and 4×4 trails, and the roads will be well-formed and easy to navigate. While there are a variety of small national parks throughout Africa, most travelers want to visit the larger, popular parks such as the Kruger National Park.

Game Reserves and Nature Reserves

Some people going on safari choose to skip the national parks and instead visit a game or nature reserve. These areas are a great place to view animals and plants in their natural environment, giving you a more authentic safari experience. However, there are some differences between the two types of reserves.

A nature reserve is designed specifically for the benefit of the animals and plants that it homes. They are intended for conservation purposes and will attempt to limit the impact that human activities have on the wildlife in the reserve. The Kogelberg Nature Reserve, which is located outside of Cape Town, is one of the most well-known nature reserves in Africa.

Game reserves, on the other hand, are focused on the preservation of animal life. In a game reserve, which is also called a game park, animals native to Africa such as giraffes and rhinoceros will be protected. Also, game parks generally allow for activities like hiking through the reserve and viewing the animals. If a game reserve specifically forbids hunting, it usually also qualifies as a nature reserve.

What About Wilderness Areas?

A wilderness area is an area that has not been tampered with by humans. In these areas, there are no roads or infrastructure of any kind, and the plants and animals are allowed to evolve without human involvement. While it is possible to visit a wilderness area while on safari, many travelers find these areas too extreme. However, if you want to experience African wildlife in its natural state, a wilderness area is the place to do so.

Now that you know the difference between national parks, game preserves, and wilderness areas, you can plan an African safari that you’ll be sure to enjoy.

Jill Liphart for Roho Ya Chui

 

Best Beaches to Visit in Cape Town

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When you go on an African safari, there are a variety of ways that you could have fun, including spending some time in the gorgeous Cape Town. Visiting Cape Town is a great choice, as the city offers several opportunities for fun and excitement. However, if you’re main goal is enjoying the beautiful weather in Cape Town, then you need to learn about the gorgeous beaches featured in this city.

Here are a few of the best beaches you should visit in Cape Town, and tips for having the best time possible on your next African safari.

Clifton

While virtually every beach in Cape Town is worth your time, the most popular choice is visiting one of the four beaches in the Clifton area. The sand at these beaches are pristine and the water is one of the most striking shades of blue that you’ve ever seen. In addition, these beaches experience very little wind, making for one of the best days on the beach in your entire life.

These beaches are packed during the busy holiday seasons, so visiting a Clifton beach during the less popular times of the year is a good idea.

Llandudno Beach

If you want to experience Cape Town the way that the locals do, then it’s a good idea to visit a beach that’s a favorite with residents, which is a great reason to plan an outing at Llandudno Beach. Attractive granite boulders surround this beach, making it feel like a secluded getaway.

Also, because this beach has Blue Flag status, you’ll be able to enjoy a variety of exciting beach activities. Some of the most popular choice for recreation at Llandudno beach include picnics on the beach, sandcastle building, and surfing. While you can certainly go for a swim at the beach, the water is usually pretty cool unless it’s an especially warm day.

Boulders Beach

Another beach in Cape Town that’s known for rocky formations is Boulders Beach. The inlets between the granite boulders on this beach provide easy access to the Indian Ocean that is perfect for snorkeling and swimming. Boulders Beach is also one of the only places in the entire world where you can see the African Penguin up close and personal.

If you don’t feel like sitting in the sand, there are several boardwalks around this beach where you can go for a leisurely stroll and enjoy the scenery. Visiting Boulders Beach is a great choice for families.

Grotto Beach

If you’re interested in visiting a Cape Town area beach that is not too crowded and provides some of the most beautiful views in this part of Africa, then you should take a drive to Grotto Beach. Because this beach isn’t usually crowded, you should be able to soak up the sun or go for a swim without having to worry about other people. This beach also stretches over a mile, providing a fantastic view of both the ocean and the nearby mountains. During September and November, whales can often be seen swimming off the coast.

When you’re booking your next African safari, make sure your trip includes a stop at one of these Cape Town beaches.

Jill Liphart for Roho Ya Chui

The History of Kruger National Park

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Kruger National Park is South Africa’s first national park and one of the largest game reserves in the world. Every year, it hosts millions of visitors from all over the world anxious to go on an African Big Five safari tour and see the continent’s most celebrated, majestic wildlife. The efforts the South African government and local private reserve operators put in also make Kruger one of the most convenient, comfortable and easy-to-reach destinations for Big Five safari tours.

The current success and popularity of Kruger would never have happened without the hard efforts of past South African government officials and passionate conservationists. Learn more about the park’s history and how it came be one of the most popular wildlife preservations in the world by reading on.

Small Beginnings: The Sabi Game Reserve

The Sabi Game reserve was established in 1898 by the former South African Republic. Early park commissioners established a general area equivalent to just over 4,000 square miles. Soon after the game reserve lands were declared, the Second Boer War broke out. A resulting British victory caused all of the formerly Dutch-held Transvaal lands to be transferred to British rule.

The British appointed several wardens to the reserve, and the third one, James Stevenson-Hamilton, became successful at expanding the role of park management. He appointed his own game rangers, assigning them territories to protect within Sabi and surrounding areas. By 1903, a new reserve was established nearby, the Shingwedzi Game Reserve. In 1906, the first hunting ban was enacted between the Olifants and Letaba Rivers.

Around 1916, some within the commission in charge of operating the reserves began to request that the boundaries be shrunk to make way for industry, hunting and exploitation of resources. A report was conducted to study the effects, but when it was released in 1918, it firmly established that not only would the reserves remain intact, but that they would be developed for visitation and easier access to game wardens.

As the report wrote: “The provincial administration should be directed toward the creation of the area ultimately as a great national park where the natural and prehistoric conditions of our country can be preserved for all time.”

The Formation of Kruger National Park

Tourists first began to visit the Sabi reserve in 1923 as part of South African Railways’ renowned “Round in Nine” tours. At the time, park visits consisted of a short bush walk while escorted by armed rangers. These walks proved so popular that the efforts to expand them hastened the establishment of the reserve area as a true national park.

The park was officially proclaimed in 1926, and it was named after the former South African Republic president Paul Kruger, who governed from 1825 to 1904. The first game three tourist vehicles wound their way through Kruger in 1927. Visitors then had to establish their own camps in the bush since the park was devoid of any amenities.

Road construction began that same year, and by 1929 over 383 miles of road were created. In 1948, the park hit a new record of 58,739 visitors. However, the first sealed tarmac roads were not created until 1965. The park was seeing around 300,000 annual visitors by that time.

Visiting Kruger and Big Five Safari Tours Now

Today, Kruger remains one of the most popular natural destinations in the world. Over 1.6 million visitors came to the park in the 2014/2015 season, with 382,396 guests staying overnight.

Big five safari tours and game drives remain one of the most popular attractions in the park, with dozens of comfortable safari lodging options to accommodate a wide variety of budgets and preferences.

If you are interested in visiting Kruger on a safari tour of your own, we offer many different South African safari tour packages to choose from. You can select from a range of amazing and transformative experiences, or you can create your own custom safari tour package when you contact us today!

Jill Liphart for Roho Ya Chui