Where to Visit Africa in August

how-is-christmas-on-african-safari

Africa’s predictable seasons make planning your African safari tour easy. Different parts of the continent have peak visiting times throughout the year for various attractions, helping you pick the most astonishing and memorable activities to take part in during your trip depending on the time you choose.

If you aim to visit Africa in August, for instance, it is the perfect time for both viewing wild game and experiencing some of the most incredible cities on the continent. To help you plan your trip, take a look at the following exciting places to see and activities you can do there.

Botswana

August means that the long, dry winter season in southern Africa is finally winding to a close. During the course of the winter, a lack of rain causes much of the vegetation to die and the temporary water holes to deplete.

This may not sound like the most scenic time to visit, but less vegetation means it will be easier to spot animals that are unable to hide in the tall summer grasses. A lack of water also means that many animals like elephants, lions, gazelle and antelope will all gather near the remaining rivers and permanent water holes, creating spectacular interactions and perfect photo ops.

To get the best viewing in Botswana during your August safari, make sure to visit Chobe National Park and the Moremi Game Reserve.

Namibia

Winter in Africa can bring some surprisingly chilly winds and frigid nights. In August, these temperatures finally begin to inch their way back up, creating the perfect in-between weather for a light jacket and mild days.

There may be no better time on the calendar to visit the deserts of Namibia. You can take sunrise pictures of the towering dunes to capture magnificent photos worthy of a National Geographic spread.

Cape Town, South Africa

Mild weather makes Cape Town a veritable paradise in August. The incredible wildflowers of Table Mountain first begin to bloom around this time, and many wineries are just beginning to roll out the red carpet for Spring’s slew of guests.

Whale watching is also incredible during this time of year. Many pods of southern right whales converge upon South Africa’s coast to calve during this time, offering one of the best opportunities of the year to see them breaching with their mates and newborn calves.

Zambia

Travelling to Zambia in August offers a fair mix of weather and small crowds as the area’s bush camps begin to prepare for their busy season. Mana Pools National Park is a great place to visit during this time as there are few mosquitos, the days are often clear and wildlife viewing is optimal thanks to the thinned vegetation.

You could also travel to South Luangwa National Park for a unique canoeing safari trip where you can get up close and personal with some of the continent’s most iconic animals.

Lake Malawi

The start of spring also happens to be amazing beach weather, giving you a wonderful excuse to explore the crystal clear blue waters of Lake Malawi on a sailboat or kayak.

Book Your August African Safari Tour Now to Save

Booking your African safari tour for August right now can give you the perfect opportunity to save on lodging and game viewing rates. As the peak tourism season approaches, many game lodges and camps still struggle with vacancies and sometimes offer incentives to fill their books.

Take a look at our sample African safari tour itineraries to get an idea of the amazing time you could be having on your luxurious African vacation in August.

Jill Liphart for Roho Ya Chui

Travel Gear to Keep Your Valuables Safe

where-can-I-find-information-on-african-photographic-safaris

Travel gear companies know the struggles modern globetrotters face. When you stick out as a non-local with the means to travel, you can paint a big target on your back for enterprising thieves. In response, travel gear companies provide a wide range of creatively designed gear to secure your valuables, hide them, or help you avoid other common risks.

So, if you are planning on hitting some big cities during your African safari travels but want to worry less about whether your valuables will make the trip back, you can invest in some of the best anti-theft travel gear, like the following:

Body Wallet

Body wallets are long, sturdy pouches designed to be worn as close to the body as possible, deterring pickpockets while helping to conceal the presence of valuables on your body. There are many different styles, including body wallets that act like an undershirt fanny pack, ones that hang under your armpit like a gun holster and even ones that wrap around your ankle under your sock.

Just remember that these wallets should not be used for everyday shopping and spending because reaching under your shirt or into your sock draws even more attention than a casual wallet grab. Instead, travel wallets are best for things like extended bus trips, first trips to the hotel and your flight out.

Locking Backpacks, Suitcases and Bags

Plenty of gear makers have offer bags specifically designed for travel. You can recognize them by their tough webbing, lockable zippers and hidden compartments. None of these things will prevent a thief from snatching the bag wholesale, but they do keep people from quickly rummaging around in your backpack while you are distracted.

Slashproof Bags and Purses

One common tactic thieves use is to simply slash the underside of your bag or purse so that all the contents spill out. You can prevent this by purchasing slashproof travel bags made with tough, reinforced webbing and straps that don’t break easily.

Padlocks, Wire Locks and Wire Mesh

Bringing along a wire or wire mesh you can use to secure your belongings can provide versatile security in a variety of situations. If you are on a long bus trip or want to take a nap in the airport terminal, for instance, you can rest easier knowing your belongings are attached to something sturdy.

Travel Door Locks

We feel secure behind locked doors in our own homes, but we may not be able to trust the door locks in our hotels or hostels when we travel abroad. Travel door locks work in any jamb, if you’ll forgive the pun, stopping anyone from forcing the door open as long as the hinges remain secure.

You can see an example here. They also make drawer locks!

Adventure Underwear

We’ll be the first to admit that we’re not too sure about this one. They have a small pocket that is perfect for hiding credit cards and some folded bills when you don’t need to access them immediately, but they may be a bit uncomfortable to wear while sitting or walking for long periods of time. Our advice is to try them before you leave!

Get More Tips on the Best Anti-Theft Travel Gear

If you have specific questions about staying safe based on the African safari tour you will be taking, you can always ask one of our travel experts for advice, ideas and explanations. Remember, it’s easy to travel safe in Africa as long as you travel smart!

Jill Liphart for Roho Ya Chui, Travel Africa

 

Human History at Oldupai Gorge

photographic-safari-packages-south-africa-masai-mara-kenya-botswana-tanzania-namibia-maasai-people

Around 30,000 years ago, intense geological activity combined with millennia of erosion exposed the area now known as Oldupai Gorge (once erroneously called “Olduvai Gorge”). Fast forward to July 1959, and paleoanthropologist Mary Leakey finally grasped the significance of what was exposed there when she stumbled upon an odd-looking skull lying in the dirt.

Fossils dating back to the dawn of mankind trace our history to Oldupai Gorge in the heart of Africa. The findings of Mary Leakey and her husband Louis show some of mankind’s earliest documented ancestors, who existed over a million years before the discovery of stone tools. This discovery has led to decades of intense study, which has helped shed light on the development of humans as we evolved over millions of years.

Many anthropologists and archaeologists theorize that all of Homo sapiens originated from Africa, the Mother Continent, some millions of years ago thanks to the findings at sites like Oldupai.

Oldupai Gorge and Ngorongoro Crater as the “Cradle of Mankind”

Oldupai Gorge is found in Ngorongoro Crater, a caldera that formed when a massive volcano collapsed upon itself.

To the southwest, about halfway to Lake Eyasi, lies Laetoli. Here, Mary Leakey discovered and excavated some of the earliest evidence of upright-walking hominids found on the planet. 3.7 million years ago, early Australopithecus afarensis hominids, of a similar species to “Lucy,” stepped in a mixture of volcanic ash and mud. This mixture hardened, preserving footprints later buried under millions of years of sediment and then uncovered.

From this evidence, the Leakeys and others were able to essentially reconstruct the development of mankind in the area over millions of years. Australopithecus remains lead to Zinjanthropus, the type of proto-human that Mary Leaker first discovered in Oldupai. There is also evidence of Homo habilis, who made some of the earliest stone tools found in Oldupai’s 1.8 million to 1.6 million year old deposits. From there, our brain sizes increased as we evolved into the more adept Homo sapiens, spreading knowledge of stone tools and early farming techniques as we became increasingly nomadic.

See Some of the Earliest Signs of Humanity at the Oldupai Museum

At the Oldupai Museum in the Ngorongoro Crater, you can find many fascinating exhibits documenting historic archeological finds. A set of the Laetoli footprints can be found based on an imprint mold taken just a few miles south. Evidence of animal remains, the early ones gnawed upon and the later ones bearing clear stone tool cut marks, can also be found.

The museum also documents Information on early human civilization as well as the later colonization of the Crater by the Masai people. Nearby, you can find a cultural Boma that can immerse you in the life of the Masai people. Handmade souvenirs bearing traditional art and patterns are available. There is also a lecture space, public toilets and refreshments. Guided tours are available into the crater or into the Oldupai Gorge itself.

You can see all of these sights on a trip to the Ngorongoro Crater — and discover the beginnings of humankind as we know it — when you book a Tanzania safari tour package today.

Jill Liphart for Roho Ya Chui, Travel Africa

More Than Gorillas: Primates of East Africa

want-to-see-the-victoria-falls

Primates intrigue us for many reasons, not the least of which is their similarity to our own mannerisms and physical makeup. Africa is the only place in the world to see most of the highly developed primate species as well as unique specimens like the bush baby and vervet monkey.

And, yes, gorillas number among these species, but since gorillas get much of the focus when talking about African primates, we decided to highlight some other interesting species worth taking a look at when on an east African safari.

Bush Baby

Bush babies are one of the smallest primates and one species group that people often forget are included in the order. They are noted for their enormous eyes, nocturnal nature and characteristic “crying” mating call that actually does sound quite like a baby.

Bush babies exhibit fewer human-like characteristics than other primates, but they can still engage in social bonding activities like play and grooming. And they can actually be quite sweet when they bond with humans. Just don’t get any ideas; they are illegal to own as pets and cannot thrive outside of the wild.

Vervet Monkey

Vervet monkeys are easily recognizable for their small shape, sandy-colored fur and tufts of wispy white hairs. They are not afraid of humans — quite the opposite, in fact! Having a group of vervet monkeys jump on your car roof as you enter a park is not an uncommon occurrence.

They usually expect to be given food in these situations, but feeding them is illegal since it disrupts their natural diet and encourages them to be even worse pests. Plus, they may be cute but can still bite!

Colobus Monkeys

Colobus monkeys are much more elusive primates despite their body size (up to 50 lbs) and the easily spotted wispy white hair growths on their arms and tail. These black-and-white coats were once prized as ceremonial attire until hunting of Colobus furs was made illegal.

Since they flee from the sight of humans and rarely leave their treetops for the ground, you are more likely to hear colobus monkeys than see them.

Baboons

While they are more different than us compared to apes, baboons are actually the second-most successful primate species on the planet. They can adapt to a variety of environmental conditions and tend to live near cliffs, forests, savannas and even near highways! In fact, baboons have been so successful at living outside of protected areas that many farmers consider them crop-stealing pests.

Chimpanzees

Chimpanzees are the most similar living primates to us humans on the planet. They share 98 percent of our genetic makeup, and they even have the same number of teeth as us.

Observations of chimpanzees by researchers, including Dame Jane Goodall, have revealed their complex and quite human-like social structures. They use tools, exhibit a range of sympathetic emotions and can even engage in warfare between chimp groups.

Unfortunately, while chimpanzees have success breeding both within and without captivity, habitat loss, disease, poaching and illegal trading of chimpanzees as pets has led to significant loss in chimp populations.

See All of These Magical Monkeys and Amazing Apes on an East African Safari

Countries like Kenya and Uganda offer the best chance at seeing most or all of these wonderful, intriguing species. Make sure to book your east African safari tour with primates in mind since many tour guides and companies can help take you to the perfect spot to catch a look at your favorite monkey or ape species.

Jill Liphart for Roho Ya Chui, Travel Africa

Meerkat Fun on a Kalahari Safari

merkats

Meerkats: they may not have quite as much personality as Nathan Lane imbued Timon with in The Lion King, but they certainly come close. Their expressive faces and social tendencies endear them to humans for being similar to us but also ridiculously cute.

But make no mistake: meerkats may be cute, but they are ruthlessly efficient when it comes to working as a team while foraging, burrowing or even waging war over territory with other meerkat clans. Catching a glimpse of them in the wild can be fascinating, so keep these fun meerkat facts in mind during your Kalahari safari trip.

Meerkats Are Only Found in the Kalahari and Namib Deserts

Meerkats are a unique species. While they belong in the Herpestidae family with mongooses, they are the only species in the genus Suricata.

They exhibit highly unique traits compared to other mongooses, as well, including an evolved social structure and a tendency to live in burrows. They also mostly live in one place on the planet: the Kalahari desert. They can also be found in parts of the Namib desert along the coast of Namibia.

Therefore, if you want to see meerkats, the best places to visit would be Botswana, Namibia or South Africa.

Meerkats Live in Advanced Societies

Meerkats live in family “clans” dominated by a matriarch and her male mate. Labor is divided among the adult meerkats when it comes to digging burrows, foraging for food, standing watch for predators, and even nursing the matriarch’s pups.

One of the most notable of these duties is how several meerkats will act as sentries during the day while other members forage, play, or relax. These sentries will rotate, like people keeping watch. When a sentry spots a threat like a tawny eagle wheeling in the sky, they will bark out a specific warning call and send everyone scurrying back into the burrow. The drongo bird will even take advantage of this behavior by sounding a false alert when it can get a free meal.

Meerkats Have Highly Adapted Bodies

Adaptive traits of the meerkat include:

  • Large eyes set at slight angles for great sweeping visibility as well as an acute sense of depth
  • Dark circles around their eyes to reduce glare
  • Large ears for excellent hearing and also to radiate heat
  • Transparent third eyelids and an ability to shut their ears tight, both of which protect them during digging
  • Long, slender bodies adapted for tunneling but also advantageous for keeping watch; strong hind legs and a stiff tail also help them stand upright
  • Shovel-like claws for digging and snatching insects
  • An immunity to scorpion poison at adulthood
  • Thin-skinned bellies perfect for sunbathing when the meerkat wants to warm up

Meerkats Are Family-Oriented

Meerkat matriarchs only give birth to about four pups in a breeding season, so the entire clan looks after these pups to ensure their future survival. Some females will even help the matriarch nurse her pups by acting as wet nurses.

When meerkats sense danger, they will ensure that the pups are the first to flee. If they must confront threats, meerkat clans will place themselves in between pups and the danger to act as a shield.

One of the most surprising traits of meerkats, though, is how they can recognize individual’s voices like we would recognize our siblings’.

Come See Meerkats on Your Kalahari Safari

You can book a trip for a Kalahari safari tour in Botswana or South Africa to get a wild and personal look at meerkats in their home habitat.

Jill Liphart for Roho Ya Chui, Travel Africa

The famousZambia

wildlife-photography-courses-masai-mara-kenya-tanzania-south-africa-botswana-water-victoria-falls

Zambia is home to some of the most spectacular aquatic sites in the world, including its lengthy list of majestic and stunningly unique waterfalls. Victoria Falls, the largest waterfall in the world in terms of sheer size, counts among these.

You will also find all manner of spectacular waterfalls and cascades all throughout the country. Here are our top five we recommend:

Victoria Falls

One of the most iconic natural landmarks in Africa and one of the officially designated “Seven Wonders of the World,” Victoria Falls sits in a league all unto its own. Locals know it as “Mosi-oa-Tunya” or “the smoke that thunders” because its spray and thunderous roar can be seen and heard from miles away.

In total, Victoria Falls measures 5,604 ft in width and 354 ft in height, creating the world’s largest single curtain of falling water. During the height of the rainy season, over five hundred million cubic meters of water cascade over its edge. Cutting through zigzagging gorges, the pools that result from the falls draw rare wildlife from all around the region, including Grant’s zebra, Katanga lions, water buffalo, giraffe, elephants, vervet monkeys, baboons and many more.

Kalambo Falls

Located on the border between Zambia and Tanzania, Kalambo Falls is among the tallest waterfalls in Africa. Here, you will not only find rare sights like marabou stork nests but also fascinating anthropological sites. These extensively excavated sites were once home to prehistoric cultures dating back tens of thousands of years.

Ngonye Falls

Next to Victoria Falls, the Ngonye Falls make up some of the most majestic and incredible waterfalls in Zambia. They surround a wide, horseshoe-shaped basin at the transition point between the Zambezi River’s wide Kalahari flatland region and its more tumultuous and narrower path through basalt rock.

On either end of the falls, you can stand on rocks while the water gushes underneath. Below in the gorge, you will frequently find herds of elephants bathing, drinking or taking a rest.

The Kundalila Falls

The Kundalila Falls are not quite as noteworthy for their water flows as they are for the unique ecological habitat they create. Thin veils of water cascade over a wide swathe of rock, carving out deep pools on the bottom while sending sprays throughout the area. These sprays sustain a striking array of wild flowers as well as a richly diverse community of wildlife.

Lumangwe Falls

These falls are like a thunderous version of Victoria Falls writ small. They are found at a sudden drop in the Kalungwishi River in the Northern Province, providing a remote and frequently secluded camping spot for visitors. New lodges and visitor facilities have also been recently built nearby, making this area the perfect getaway spot for those on safari.

Come See Victoria Falls and the Other Famous Waterfalls of Zambia on a Safari Tour

You can book a trip to Victoria Falls, one of Africa’s most famous locations, as well as to any and all of these other gorgeous waterfalls when you enjoy one of our Zambia safari tour packages. Find your perfect safari vacation itinerary, and then book your trip today!

Jill Liphart for Roho Ya Chui, Travel Africa

Safari in the city: Johannesburg

what-not-to-miss-on-african-safari-at-the-victoria-falls

Going on a safari in South Africa to most people means seeing big cats, rhinos, elephants and other notable species in Kruger Park. While this is certainly a great way to spend your time, you should make certain that you do not miss out on the other aspects of the region’s beauty.

More specifically, you should take a look at cities like Johannesburg to see the unique sights, sounds and experiences they can offer. While a relatively young city by most standards, “Joburg” as it is known by many locals is still steeped in history and rich culture. Anyone interested in getting the full experience of a South African vacation should therefore spend a few days in Johannesburg in order to catch the following attractions:

Johannesburg Botanical Garden

The Johannesburg Botanical Garden can be found in the Emmarentia suburbs to the north of downtown. Far removed from the densely packed bustle of the inner city, this massive 308 acre complex was founded in 1964 as a large rose garden upon a former farm estate.

The Rose Garden, with over 10,000 roses and dozens of world species, still remains a primary draw for visitors, but the park has also expanded to encompass many other areas and themes. Visitors can find a succulent garden, a prehistoric cycad garden, a preserved bird island, and a rare surviving example of a Shakespeare garden.

Johannesburg’s Botanical Garden lands also includes the adjacent Emmarentia Dam, which creates gorgeous, tranquil reservoirs surrounded by trees, walking trails, braai barbeque pits and more, making the park a perfect way to spend the afternoon.

Constitution Hill

Once an example of the oppression that minorities and political dissidents endured in South Africa, Constitution Hill has been transformed into a simultaneous ray of hope for local democracy in addition to a reminder of the mistakes of our past.

This “living museum” was once the site of a political prison as well as the Old Fort first built to protect the Boers from British invaders. These facilities have been transformed into monuments and educational museums, but South Africa’s Constitutional Court also actively operates here, interpreting law and making decisions that it feels are in the general interest of all South African citizens.

Visiting Constitution Hill is a once-in-a-lifetime experience that will leave a lasting impression for years to come.

Johannesburg Zoo

You don’t have to go to Kruger or out in the bush to see wildlife in Johannesburg. Our city zoo has a huge variety of exotic species not just from Africa, but all over the world. It contains the only two polar bears in the entire continent, for instance, as well as one of the few breeding centers for white lions in the world.

African Craft Market of Rosebank

This open market is one of the most colorful and unique of any in the world. You will find all sorts of handmade goods, clothing and crafts here, making it the perfect spot to pick up a souvenir for yourself or someone you care about.

Visiting the market also puts you in the neighborhood of Rosebank, one of the more cosmopolitan and tourist-friendly sections of the city. You can tour famous landmarks, see local architecture and observe our city’s beautiful man-made forest while taking a walking along the city streets.

So Much More to See and Do in Johannesburg During Your South African Safari

These attractions are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to enjoying yourself during your South African safari vacation. Take a look at our South Africa safari tour packages to get a taste of Kruger as well as tours of Johannesburg and nearby Cape Town during your trip.

Book your African safari vacation today!

Jill Liphart for Roho Ya  Chui, Travel Africa